Horrifyingly Healthy Halloween Snacks

Monday, October 24, 2011
Halloween can be a recipe for disaster. Candy corn, cupcakes, brownies, sacks full of treats — talk about sugar overload! There's got to be a better option, right?
Oranges cut like jack-o'-lanterns
Sarah Martin

BOO-nanasThe following recipes are simple to prepare, fun to eat and sure to please everyone in the family.

BOO-nanas

Peel a banana and press in raisins or carob chips to make a spooky face! Use raspberries or strawberries as blood to make an extra-creepy treat.

Jack-O'(range)-Lantern

Carve an orange as you would a pumpkin by removing a piece from the top and scooping out the insides with a spoon. Cut out a design on the front of the orange using a serrated knife. Mix the pulp with diced strawberries and place back into the orange for a fruit salad in a fun and festive bowl.

Worms and Dirt healthy Halloween snackWorms and Dirt

This treat puts a spin on the old classic without all the sugar and artificial candy. A small serving can be perfect as a snack, or try a larger and muddier mess for a chilling breakfast. In a bowl combine:

1/2 cup crushed bran flakes or your favorite brown whole-grain cereal
1 teaspoon maple syrup or honey
1 tablespoon raisins
1 tablespoon peanut (or other nut) butter
Cinnamon to taste

Slice a banana into 1- to 2-inch strips and hide "maggots" all around.

Egg eyeballsEgg Eyeballs

Slice a hard-boiled egg in half and scoop out part of the yolk. Insert half a pitted olive for a frightening snack.

These are just a few frightening ideas. Get creative with your favorite snacks and see what spooky treats you can create!

Sarah Martin, dietetic intern, and Debra A. Boutin, MS, RD, chair and dietetic internship director, Department of Nutrition and Exercise Science at Bastyr University.

FALL 2017
Have questions about a program?
Request information »

More Health Tips

  • There are ways to help treat IBS using safe, natural products, and life-style intervention. 

  • There are many ways to monitor and change your individual risk of heart disease.

  • Purchasing food grown closer to your home will provide great health, economic and environmental benefits.

  • With the number of Type 2 Diabetes patients quickly rising, it's time to start preventing this disease by changing dietary and exercise habits. Dr. Jennifer Pilon sheds some light on how to prevent this disease naturally.
  • Get help decreasing your pesticide exposure without going over budget with the Environmental Working Group's lists of the "Dirty Dozen" and the "Clean Fifteen."
  • Adding delicious and healthful anti-inflammatory foods to your diet can help give your body a fighting chance if you suffer from seasonal allergies.